Anting Anting Turns Ten

September 13, 2009
Alfredo Esquillo Jr., "Pangakong Langit"

Alfredo Esquillo Jr., "Pangakong Langit"

When we think of Cavite, we think of Emilio Aguinaldo hoisting the flag of the first Philippine Republic from his balcony in Kawit, of the tulisans that struck fear and terror on average folk, of Ramon Revilla, as Nardong Putik, brandishing his agimat against the forces of evil.  We also know the agimat as the anting-anting, an amulet against danger and death, one’s defense against bodily harm.

Emmanuel Garibay, "Republika ng Sining"

Emmanuel Garibay, "Republika ng Sining"

Lawrence Bersoto

Lawrence Bersoto, "Summer of the Gang"

Ten years ago, when a group of artists from the province of  Cavite banded together, they called themselves Anting-anting after this cultural trademark.  They first came together as an informal group to share ideas, mount exhibits, and hold workshops.  Today, the eleven members  regard Anting-anting as barkada. Hardly any of them call Cavite home anymore.  From a group of artists pooling their talents into a collective, they have become a group of friends who all happen to be artists.

Salvation History marks the first in a series of three shows planned to celebrate Anting-anting’s 10th Anniversary.  Each of the artists’ distinct styles come together under the themes of Langit (Heaven), Lupa (Earth), Impiyerno (Hell).  A different venue plays host to each exhibit.

Dei Jardiniano, "Looking at Heaven Through God's Eyes"

Dei Jardiniano, "Looking at Heaven Through God's Eyes"

Mounted in Tin-Aw’s spanking new space (right beside their old one!), the eleven artists of Anting-Anting bring us their versions of heaven.  Alfredo Esquillo Jr. paints another

Rosario Sanchez

Rosario Sanchez at left and Clairelynn Uy at right

archival masterpiece, Pangakong Langit, where an indigenous Filipino flutters free from bondage, escaping from the menial task of carrying his American burden.  Within the frame of his oil on rubber piece, Esqui carves a phrase from the  protest song Bayan Ko,  originally written  for the American occupation.  Emmanuel Garibay chooses to illustrate the fake nirvana continually pledged by our politicians.  Play I Spy with his piece, Republika ng Sining, and see if you can spot the controversial personalities that surround his principal subject,  a politician or priest whose elongated nose calls Pinocchio to mind.  On the corner, a smiling Ate Glo (note the enhanced mammary glands!) cradles a figure that sports Carlo Caparas’ trademark cap, long locks, and shades.

Jojo Lofranco, "Balloon"

Jojo Lofranco, "Balloon"

Lawrence Bersoto portrays fierce guardians of heaven’s gate in Summer of the Gang.  You don’t immediately notice that the splashes of white in Jojo Lofranco’s Balloon depict the face of Pope John Paul II.  Underneath all the layers of color, already rendered invisible, he put in other religious leaders to illustrate the different views of heaven, Osama Bin Laden among them.  Dei Jardiniano ‘s mixed media piece, Looking Into Heaven Through God’s Eye, is made up of a painting that resembles a pastel dartboard and a chrome sculpture that you peep into like a telescope.  When focused on the painting, the lenses distort his colors in the manner of a kaleidoscope.

Christian Tamondong, "Over A Cup Of Coffee"

Christian Tamondong, "Over A Cup Of Coffee"

You get a diverse range of paintings, from Garibay and Esqui’s social histories to Christian Tamondong’s depiction of heaven as a steaming cup of coffee.  The exhibit gives us a mixed bag for every inclination.

The members of Anting-anting are Emmanuel Garibay, Alfredo Esquillo Jr., Wilfredo Alicdan, Dei Jardiniano, Jojo Lofranco, Clairelynn Uy, Cris Sipat, Jojo Austria, Lawrence Bersoto, Rosario Sanchez, and Christian Tamondong.

Jojo Austria, "Prayer for Deliverance"

Jojo Austria, "Prayer for Deliverance"

Salvation History runs from 11 to 30 September 2009 at Tin-Aw Art Management Inc., Upper Ground Floor, Somerset Olympia, Makati Avenue, Makati.  Phone (632) 892-7522 or visit http:// www.tin-aw.com


Viewing Paulino Que’s Collection of Young Contemporary Artists (aka, The I Wish They Were Mine Show)

March 16, 2009

 

Three years ago, Ambeth Ocampo arranged for the

Kim Atienza and Ayala Museum's Ken Esguerra with Jojo Legaspi's "St Thelma"

Kim Atienza and Ayala Museum's Ken Esguerra with Jojo Legaspi's "St Thelma"

Board of Trustees of the Museum Foundation of the Philippines to view Paulino and Hetty Que’s collection of Philippine art and historical objets.  Ambeth, perhaps only half-kidding, dubbed the occasion the tour of the”… real National Gallery”.  As he took us through the assembly of works, from Juan Luna’s canvases, to Fabian dela Rosa’s landscapes, then onto the Amorsolos, and the Thirteen Moderns, from the Ben Cabs to the Ang Kiukoks, we realized what Ambeth meant.  The staggering display covered the whole gamut of Philippine art history from Damian Domingo’s Academia de Dibujo to the 1980s.  

Alfredo Esquillo Jr., "The Thomasites Were Here"

Alfredo Esquillo Jr., "The Thomasites Were Here"

Geraldine Javier and Ateneo's Leo Garcia with her piece, "Bubbles In His Head"

Geraldine Javier and Ateneo's Leo Garcia with her piece, "Bubbles In His Head"

Trust a collector like Paulino Que to keep up with the times.  What had not been on view then, he shares with Philippine art lovers now as he brings out his collection of young contemporaries.  What a treat to see the best of the best of paintings from 1996 to today, from the most celebrated and exciting artists we currently follow.  

View from upstairs of Elmer Borlongan's "Solo Show"

View from upstairs of Elmer Borlongan's "Solo Show"

Thank you to Paulino for generously sharing a part of his collection, and allowing us the privilege to witness contemporary art history in the making.

Kawayan De Guia, "Subtle Repercussions A"

Kawayan De Guia, "Subtle Repercussions A"

Yael Buencamino, Gerry Tan, and Mark Justiniani's "Roundtrip Overload"

Yael Buencamino, Gerry Tan, and Mark Justiniani's "Roundtrip Overload"

John and Pam Santos with John's piece, "Behind the Scenes"

John and Pam Santos with John's piece, "Behind the Scenes"

Of the 21 pieces up on Finale’s huge walls,  there are a few that I wish I could wrap up and hang on mine:  Jojo Legaspi’s St. Thelma tops my list.  No one else depicts stark terror and anger as finely as he does.  You feel the profanity come to life.  Then, Geraldine Javier at her lyrical and melancholic best with Bubbles in His Head.  So sadly beautiful.  I wish I had the means to commission Behind the Scenes by Jose Santos III.  John just keeps getting better and better.  The Thomasites Were Here  brings us  another of Alfredo Esquillo Jr’s excellently- rendered commentaries on Philippine historical events.   Too bad I don’t have the space for this triptych (as if!).  And I must say I also love Kawayan De Guia’s  Subtle Repercussions A which I find to be the most contemporary of the bunch. 

Robert Langenegger, "Rolling Paperworks" and Louie Cordero, "Untitled"

Robert Langenegger, "Rolling Paperworks" and Louie Cordero, "Untitled"

Would love to hear your favorites!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mona and Soler Santos viewing Annie Cabigting's "Viewing Bacon"

Mona and Soler Santos viewing Annie Cabigting's "Viewing Bacon"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figuring The Times, Philippine Paintings 1996 to 2009, A Selection from the Paulino Que Collection is on view at Finale Art File from 13 March to 3 April 2009.  Finale is located at Warehouse 17, La Fuerza Compound, Pasong Tamo, Makati.  Phone (632) 810-4071 or visit www.finaleartfile.com.  For more information on Geraldine Javier visit www.geraldinejavier.com

 

 


TutoK Tackles Crisis; Mike Goes Eclectic

November 27, 2008
mask

Detail: Neil Pasilan Installation

TUTOKKK:  KRISIS, KALUNASAN…ANONG K MO? AT BLANC COMPOUND

Three years ago, a core group of concerned artists came together to make a stand against the spate of extra-judicial killings that hit unrecognized, anonymous, mostly rural, Filipinos.  Since then, this loosely-organized band of artists, headed by Manny Garibay and Karen Flores, have made it

Manny Garibay and Racquel de Loyola

Manny Garibay and Racquel de Loyola

tradition to put together an exhibit on or around December 1, Human Rights Day.  To quote core member Noel Soler Cuizon, “Tutok employs art as medium, message, and motivation” to call attention to important issues affecting our daily lives, collaborating with NGOs like KARAPATAN and educational institutions such as the University of Sto. Tomas, St. Scholastica’s College, and Ateneo de Manila University.

tutok-foregroundFor this, their anniversary show with an array of over a hundred 18 x 24 inch works, TutoK challenges both artists and the community at large:  what do you make of a nation, and a world, in financial crisis?

The show is on view from 30 November to 10 December 2008 at Blanc Compound, 359 Shaw Blvd, Mandaluyong, Ph: (632)752-0080 www.blanc.ph

Mark Andy Garcia and Lynyrd Paras

Mark Andy Garcia and Lynyrd Paras

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entrance Installation by Don Salubayba

Entrance Installation by Don Salubayba

By Bogie Ruiz

By Bogie Ruiz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mimi Tecson Collage

Detail: Mimi Tecson Collage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Jay Pacena

By Jay Pacena

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECLECTIC BY MICHAEL CACNIO

mike-bull

Michael Cacnio’s brass sculptures, with their decorative, often humorous, take on everyday Philippine life may seem poles apart from TutoK’s more

Subok

Detail: Subok

thought-provoking pieces.  Mike’s works are easy and whimsical and popular; his shows quickly sell out.  But the underlying viewpoint perhaps falls within the same spectrum: that of celebrating one’s Pinoyness with aplomb, no matter what life hands you.

Buking!

Buking!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eclectic by Michael Cacnio, 24 November to 7 December 2008  at 1/0f Gallery, The Shops at Serendra, Bonifacio Global City, Ph (632)901-3152 Email:  1of.gallery@gmail.com


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